“Sometimes I almost feel like music is a mistake—like we are not supposed to know about it. We have noses so we can smell, ears to hear, and eyes to see. Music, of course, comes in through out ears, but we all know that it is not just sounds. There is something else included in music that is very difficult to define. To me, it reminds us of where we were before and where we are going after. It is a mysterious vapor that somehow slips in the cracks between this plane of existence and some other one. The people who are good musicians have the ability to conjure up more of that vapor than others. Everyone recognizes it when it’s there. It something universal that goes beyond language and beyond race, country, or nationality. It is unmistakable when that vapor is there, we recognize it as something we all have in common.”
Pat Metheny (via tree-whisper)
Mont Buff (2/2) (at Bents Lookout)

Mont Buff (2/2) (at Bents Lookout)

“The violin section is divided in to the First Violins, who have the trickier parts to play, and the Second Violins, who are more fun at parties”

Lemony Snicket

from “The Composer is Dead”

(via lemonysmiley)

isay:

In 1909, [Tsar] Nicholas authorized Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii to document his empire using a new technique called additive color. Over a period of about six years, Prokudin-Gorskii took some 10,000 pictures, systematically chronicling Russia’s rich culture, industry, and architecture. His stunning photos capture the breadth of life in the last days of an empire, its rugged frontiers and rural landscapes, and the signs of its growing industrial might. They were meant to be presented as “optical color projections” to the nation’s school children, to expose them to the dazzling diversity of Russian life they wouldn’t otherwise see. The images offer a rare glimpse of pre-revolutionary Russia, in color so vivid it’s easy to forget they’re a century old. 

(via The Final Years of Pre-Soviet Russia, Captured in Glorious Color | Raw File | WIRED)

isay:

In 1909, [Tsar] Nicholas authorized Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii to document his empire using a new technique called additive color. Over a period of about six years, Prokudin-Gorskii took some 10,000 pictures, systematically chronicling Russia’s rich culture, industry, and architecture. His stunning photos capture the breadth of life in the last days of an empire, its rugged frontiers and rural landscapes, and the signs of its growing industrial might. They were meant to be presented as “optical color projections” to the nation’s school children, to expose them to the dazzling diversity of Russian life they wouldn’t otherwise see. The images offer a rare glimpse of pre-revolutionary Russia, in color so vivid it’s easy to forget they’re a century old.

(via The Final Years of Pre-Soviet Russia, Captured in Glorious Color | Raw File | WIRED)

Blue skies, smiling at me. (at Tawonga Gap)

Blue skies, smiling at me. (at Tawonga Gap)

techcrunch:

Instagram just got a whole lot more Biden. Welcome to Instagram @vp

techcrunch:

Instagram just got a whole lot more Biden. Welcome to Instagram @vp

(Source: tldrwikipedia)

littlevillains:

instead of thinking as yourself as dirt, take a baby step up and think of yourself as nutritious soil after a spring rain. grow a plant. house a worm.

The RSL’s Minute of Silence film for this year’s Anzac Appeal, filmed at the Coburg RSL.

Rather than regaling you with tales of medals, heroism, glory, or loss, I think the video is evocative enough.

Please support this very worthy cause.

[At 0:55 you’ll see a bit of my face, and my saxophone, in the blurry background.]

leadingtone:

R. Strauss
"Morgen," Op. 27 Nº 4

Christine Brewer
BBC Symphony, Walter Weller

And tomorrow the sun will shine again,
and on the path that I will take
we, the lucky ones, will be united once more
amidst the sun-breathing Earth.

And to the shore, its wide, blue waves,
we will quietly and slowly descend.
Then we will look into one another’s eyes
and the silence of happiness will fall upon us.

newsweek:

The depth of the problem
After an Australian vessel, Ocean Shield, again detected deep-sea signals consistent with those from an airplane’s black box, the official leading a multination search expressed hope Wednesday that crews will begin to find wreckage of a missing Malaysian airliner “within a matter of days.”
“I believe we’re searching in the right area,” Retired Air Chief Marshal Angus Houston said.

newsweek:

The depth of the problem

After an Australian vessel, Ocean Shield, again detected deep-sea signals consistent with those from an airplane’s black box, the official leading a multination search expressed hope Wednesday that crews will begin to find wreckage of a missing Malaysian airliner “within a matter of days.”

“I believe we’re searching in the right area,” Retired Air Chief Marshal Angus Houston said.

“I have noticed that when all the lights are on, people tend to talk about what they are doing – their outer lives. Sitting round in candlelight or firelight, people start to talk about how they are feeling – their inner lives. They speak subjectively, they argue less, there are longer pauses. To sit alone without any electric light is curiously creative. I have my best ideas at dawn or at nightfall, but not if I switch on the lights – then I start thinking about projects, deadlines, demands, and the shadows and shapes of the house become objects, not suggestions, things that need to done, not a background to thought.”

Jeanette Winterson (via mynameis-auntsarah)

Tonight we are lighting the candles.

(via isay)

(Source: tirhase)

aberjona:

Quick tour of the British Isles in accents.